2024 Texas Marijuana Policy Voter’s Guide by Texas NORML

It is an election year!

In Texas, citizen-initiated ballot propositions are not allowed, so elected officials at the state and federal levels are responsible for upholding or reforming current marijuana laws. Elections offer an opportunity for voters to decide who will represent them when these decisions are made.

Most seats in the Texas legislature, and in the U.S. Congress from Texas, are heavily gerrymandered. This means that by the time the general election happens in November those seats will either go to the Republican or Democratic candidate. Few races in the general election are competitive.

This means that it is ultimately voters who participate in the March primaries who decide which candidates will represent Texans in the coming year. Roughly 12 percent of Texas voters participate in primaries and candidates are often selected by 6 percent or fewer voters.

In short, voting in the primaries is one of the most impactful things a voter can do. Not sure how to participate in the primary? Check out the official guide.

We surveyed candidates seeking election to the Texas House, Texas Senate, U.S. House, and U.S Senate. Identify your Texas House, Texas Senate, and U.S. House Districts

Texas NORML does not endorse any candidates.

Important Primary Election Dates

  • Last day to register to vote: Feb 5
  • First day of early voting: Feb 20
  • Last day to apply for ballot by mail: Feb 23
  • Last day of early voting: March 1
  • Election Day: March 5

View the voter guide by clicking here. For best results, view directly on a laptop or desktop computer.

Federal Candidates

State Candidates

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Federal Candidate Survey Questions:

  1. Do you support or oppose changing laws to allow adults 21 and older to possess limited amounts of marijuana and establishing a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol?
  2. Do you support or oppose removing cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act?
  3. Do you support or oppose state-licensed cannabis businesses having legal access to the banking system?
  4. Do you support or oppose Veterans Administration doctors being allowed to recommend cannabis to treat service-related injuries?

State Candidate Survey Questions:

  1. Do you support or oppose changing state law to allow residents with debilitating medical conditions (e.g. chronic pain, TBI, and more) to access full spectrum medical cannabis, with physicians making dosing decisions?
  2. Do you support or oppose changing state law to make possession of less than one ounce of cannabis punishable by a fine, with no jail time, and an opportunity to avoid a criminal record?
  3. Do you support or oppose changing state law to make possession of small amounts of cannabis concentrates a misdemeanor?
  4. Do you support or oppose changing state law to allow adults 21 and older to possess limited amounts of marijuana and establishing a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol?

Texas NORML originated the first cannabis centric Voter Guide in 2012. We offer Primary Election and General Election Voter Guide editions.

Texas and 26 other states in the U.S. cannot collect signatures to place an issue on the ballot for a vote to change state law. Additionally, in 1997, Texas passed a state law requiring that all drug laws be enforced and changed at the state rather than local level. Because of these limitations, Texans must rely on our state elected officials, specifically our state representatives and state senators (so take a close look at yours). Learn more about engaging with your legislators by reviewing our Activist Training Guide.


We recommend taking the following actions in your area:

  • Register yourself and educate others on registering to vote – This is the only way we can be eligible to vote for cannabis-friendly candidates. Register to vote!
  • Share the Texas NORML Voter Guide with all of your friends and family and through social media.
  • Print and distribute. In addition to the obvious cannabis consumer friendly locations, consider printing up stacks of the Voters’ Guide and leaving them next to the League of Women Voter Guide at your local grocery stores and libraries.
  • Look up the State Representatives and State Senators for your area. Find supportive candidates on social media and follow them. Encourage your members to volunteer for their campaigns. Build relationships and plan on staying in touch throughout the legislative process.
  • Remind everyone to vote!

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